President Trump met with North Korea leader Kim Jong Un earlier this month in Singapore. (Evan Vucci / AP)

Anti-U.S. feeling in North Korea has come down from its peak following a summit between President Trump and Kim Jong Un.

The hermit kingdom’s capital city Pyongyang will not play host to the annual July rally against the U.S., the Associated Press reported Monday.

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Last year’s festivities, a month-long ordeal including a July 27 holiday celebrating “Victory in the Fatherland Liberation War,” or the Korean War, saw more than 100,000 on the streets and special anti-U.S. stamps issued.

North Korean officials did not comment on the report.

The country’s festivities last July also saw the test launch of a missile that could hit the U.S. East Coast, setting the stage for fears of nuclear war as Trump and Kim exchanged threats that August.

Last year the North Korean government made stamps for a month of anti-U.S. sentiment.
Last year the North Korean government made stamps for a month of anti-U.S. sentiment. (Korean Central News Agency/Korea News Service via AP)

This year has seen a relaxing of tensions, with meetings between Kim and South Korean President Moon Jae-in setting the stage for peace talks and discussions with Trump about denuclearization.

Beyond the rally, North Korean media has also been playing up the Kim-Trump summit and broadcasting images of the American president in the largely closed country.

The Korean War, often a focus of Pyongyang’s propaganda against the U.S., ended in 1953 with an armistice instead of a peace treaty, though Kim and Moon have agreed to start talks about officially ending it later this year.

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